• Kim Tennant

Castor & Pollux - The Original Gemini's

Castor and Pollux were twin half-brothers. Their mother was Leda, who was married to Tyndareus the King of Sparta. Castor was said to be the mortal son of Tyndareus, while Pollux was believed to be the immortal son of Zeus, who also lay with Leda after disguising himself as a swan. The twins were also known as the Gemini in Roman mythology.

Castor and Pollux were strongly connected and yet one was mortal, the other immortal. They represent the Gemini myth of two as one. Many jokes are made about those with the Sun in Gemini having more than one personality. When the balance is missing, one side may dominate but when balance is there, the persona is more centred.

Castor and Pollux were warriors. They fought many battles and shared many adventures. However, during one such adventure, Castor became wounded and lay dying. Pollux found this hard to accept and was given the choice by Zeus to share his immortality with his half-brother. Pollux agreed and so the two shared time between Olympus and Hades.

In art and literature, Castor and Pollux are associated with a variety of symbols, in particular horses. Horses were one of the earliest forms of transport and Gemini is connected with local travel (compared with its opposite sign Sagittarius, which rules distant travel). Other symbolism included have been caps with stars above. This may be representative of the mind and mental realm in which Gemini is deeply connected.

Castor and Pollux are noted as being two of the brightest stars in the sky, which originally sat close together in the constellation of Gemini. These days, due to the procession of the equinoxes, they remain together in the constellation of Cancer. Pollux glows golden, while Castor is bluish-white.